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Trovati 6 documenti.

How poets see the world
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Libri Moderni

Spiegelman, Willard.

How poets see the world : the art of description in contemporary poetry / Willard Spiegelman.

New York : Oxford University Press, 2005.

Abstract: Although readers of prose fiction sometimes find descriptive passages superfluous or boring, description itself is often the most important aspect of a poem. This book examines how a variety of contemporary poets use description in their work. Description has been the great burden of poetry. How do poets see the world? How do they look at it? What do they look for? Is description an end in itself, or a means of expressing desire? Ezra Pound demanded that a poem should represent the external world as objectively and directly as possible, and William Butler Yeats, in his introduction to The Oxford Book of Modern Verse (1936), said that he and his generation were rebelling against, inter alia, "irrelevant descriptions of nature" in the work of their predecessors. The poets in this book, however, who are distinct in many ways from one another, all observe the external world of nature or the reflected world of art, and make relevant poems out of their observations. This study deals with the crisp, elegant work of Charles Tomlinson, the swirling baroque poetry of Amy Clampitt, the metaphysical meditations of Charles Wright from a position in his backyard, the weather reports and landscapes of John Ashbery, and the "new way of looking" that Jorie Graham proposes to explore in her increasingly fragmented poems. All of these poets, plus others (Gary Snyder, Theodore Weiss, Irving Feldman, Richard Howard) who are dealt with more briefly, attend to what Wallace Stevens, in a memorable phrase, calls "the way things look each day." The ordinariness of daily reality is the beginning of the poets' own idiosyncratic, indeed unique, visions and styles.

Ecocriticism
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Libri Moderni

Garrard, Greg.

Ecocriticism / Greg Garrard.

2nd ed.

Abingdon, Oxon ; New York : Routledge 2012

The new critical idiom.

Abstract: Ecocriticism explores the ways in which we imagine and portray the relationship between humans and the environment in all areas of cultural production, from Wordsworth and Thoreau through to Google Earth, J.M. Coetzee and Werner Herzog's Grizzly Man. Greg Garrard's animated and accessible volume traces the development of the movement and explores its key concepts, including: pollution, wilderness, apocalypse, dwelling, animals, and earth. Featuring a newly rewritten chapter on animal studies, and considering queer and postcolonial ecocriticisms and the impact of globalisation, this fully updated second edition also presents a glossary of terms and suggestions for further reading in print and online. Concise, clear, and authoritative. Ecocriticism offers the ideal introduction to this crucial subject for students of literary and cultural studies.

Romantic ecology
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Libri Moderni

Bate, Jonathan.

Romantic ecology : Wordsworth and the environmental tradition / Jonathan Bate.

Abingdon : Routledge 2013

Routledge revivals

Abstract: First published in 1991, Romantic Ecology reassesses the poetry of William Wordsworth in the context of the abiding pastoral tradition in English Literature. Jonathan Bate explores the politics of poetry and argues that contrary to critics who suggest that the Wordsworth was a reactionary who failed to represent the harsh economic reality of his native Lake District, the poet's politics were fundamentally `green'. As our first truly ecological poet, Wordsworth articulated a powerful and enduring vision of human integration with nature which exercised a formative influence on later conservation movements and is of immediate relevance to great environmental issues today. Challenging the orthodoxies of new historicist criticism, Jonathan Bate sets a new agenda for the study of Romanticism in the 1990s.

The future of environmental criticism
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Libri Moderni

Buell, Lawrence.

The future of environmental criticism : environmental crisis and literary imagination / Lawrence Buell.

Malden, MA : Blackwell Pub., 2005.

Blackwell manifestos

Abstract: One of the leading theorists in ecocriticism offers a critical summary of the ecocritical movement, tracing origins of the movement in the 1970s & following developments through to the present time. Written by one of the world's leading theorists in ecocriticism, this manifesto provides a critical summary of the ecocritical movement.

Writing for an endangered world
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Libri Moderni

Buell, Lawrence.

Writing for an endangered world : literature, culture, and environment in the U.S. and beyond / Lawrence Buell.

Cambridge, Mass. : Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2001.

Abstract: This work offers a conception of the physical environment-whether built or natural-as simultaneously found and constructed, and treats imaginative representations of it as acts of both discovery and invention. A number of the chapters develop this idea through parallel studies of figures identified with either "natural" or urban settings: John Muir and Jane Addams; Aldo Leopold and William Faulkner; Robinson Jeffers and Theodore Dreiser; Wendell Berry and Gwendolyn Brooks. Focusing on nineteenth- and twentieth-century writers, but ranging freely across national borders, this book reimagines city and country as a single complex landscape. The environmental imagination does not stop short at the edge of the woods. Nor should our understanding of it, as Lawrence Buell makes clear in this book that aims to reshape the field of literature and environmental studies. Emphasizing the influence of the physical environment on individual and collective perception, his book thus provides the theoretical underpinnings for ecocriticism.

The song of the earth
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Libri Moderni

Bate, Jonathan.

The song of the earth / Jonathan Bate.

London : Picador [2000], ©2000

Abstract: In the insightful style that characterised the successful The Genius of Shakespeare, Jonathan Bate has written a series of pieces on the link between literature and the environment, such as the importance of nature in literature. This account of literature's relationship with the environment considers how words like "culture" and "environment" have evolved. It offers ideas on how interest in ecology has developed and how literature has influenced our perception of environmental issues.