Fascism in Italian cinema since 1945
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Modern Books

Lichtner, Giacomo.

Fascism in Italian cinema since 1945

Abstract: Italy gave us the words 'fascism' and 'totalitarianism', yet globally the dominant image of the regime is one of an incompetent dictatorship served by soldiers who 'would not fight for love nor money on account of their languorous Latin character', as Noel Coward wrote. This book investigates Italian cinema's contribution to stereotypes of victimhood and innocence, otherwise known as Italiani brava gente, by tracing across the postwar period filmmakers, audiences, censors and the unforgettable characters of Italian cinema. The author casts an innovative eye on classic films like Rome Open City and 1900, and analyses in depth many lesser known works, to tease out recurrent trends and ongoing taboos of representation and assess them in a comparative European perspective. From the desperate resolve of neorealism to the bloated mediocrity of Berlusconian revisionist melodramas, Italian cinema has remembered selectively and silently forgotten the most shameful pages of Italy's history.


Title and contributions: Fascism in Italian cinema since 1945 : the politics and aesthetics of memory / Giacomo Lichtner, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.

Publication: Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.

Physical description: x, 262 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.

EAN: 9780230363328

Publication date:2013

Language: eng (language of the text, soundtrack, etc..)

Note:
  • Italy gave us the words 'fascism' and 'totalitarianism', yet globally the dominant image of the regime is one of an incompetent dictatorship served by soldiers who 'would not fight for love nor money on account of their languorous Latin character', as Noel Coward wrote. This book investigates Italian cinema's contribution to stereotypes of victimhood and innocence, otherwise known as Italiani brava gente, by tracing across the postwar period filmmakers, audiences, censors and the unforgettable characters of Italian cinema. The author casts an innovative eye on classic films like Rome Open City and 1900, and analyses in depth many lesser known works, to tease out recurrent trends and ongoing taboos of representation and assess them in a comparative European perspective. From the desperate resolve of neorealism to the bloated mediocrity of Berlusconian revisionist melodramas, Italian cinema has remembered selectively and silently forgotten the most shameful pages of Italy's history.

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Classifications: 791.430945 (22)

General Processing Data (100)
  • Type of Publication Date: Publication Dates 1 and 2: monograph complete when issued, or issued within one calendar year
  • Publication Date: 2013

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Library Call Number Inventory Number Loan Status Lendability Return date
UniVIU 791.430945/LIC 1-5125
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